Gambling in California By Roger Dunstan (History of Gambling in the United States II)

1997 Gambling in California By Roger Dunstan

History of Gambling in the United States II:

II. History of Gambling in the United States

Examining the history of gambling in North America suggests important conclusions that are useful today in considering policies related to gambling.

  1. The United States has had a long history of allowing some forms of legal gambling and a degree of tolerance of illegal gambling.
  2. Societal tolerance and acceptance of legal gambling can change rapidly. Scandals and political control by gaming interests have led to backlashes which result in regulation and/or prohibition.

Societal standards and laws related to gambling have tended to change back and forth from prohibition to regulation. These changes in law have led one noted observer, Professor I. Nelson Rose, to describe three waves of gambling regulation during the history of the colonies and the United States.1 The first wave began during the colonial period and lasted until the mid-1800s. The second wave commenced at the close of the Civil War and lasted until the early 20th century. The last wave started during the Great Depression and is still going strong. Because of the length and size of this last wave, another observer has characterized it as an explosion, not a wave.2

Notes:
The First Wave: 1600’s to mid 1800’s
Second Wave: Mid-1800’s to Early 1900’s
Third Wave (Early 1930’s to Present)

Remaining Chapters (1997 Gambling in California By Roger Dunstan):

III. Lotteries
IV. Indian Gaming
V. Gambling in California
VI. Regulation of Gambling
VII. Why do People Gamble?
VIII. Why do People Gamble Too Much?–Pathological and Problem Gambling
IX. Economic Impacts of Gambling
X. Politics and Gambling
XI. Gambling and Crime
XII. Outlook and Options

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